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Thursday, May 23
 

8:00am

Continental Breakfast
Food & Coffee

Thursday May 23, 2019 8:00am - 10:00am
GTCC Ballroom Foyer Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

8:00am

Registration
Welcome

Thursday May 23, 2019 8:00am - 1:00pm
GTCC Foyer Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

8:30am

Using Simple GIS Solutions to Engage and Empower the Community
The Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA) is a marine cargo operating partnership of the Port of Seattle and Port of Tacoma and is the fourth-largest container gateway in North America. Part of NWSA’s mission is to conduct outreach and educate the public about Port activities and events. Typically, these efforts are led by our Communications Department who do an amazing job of engaging the community through social media posts, website updates, articles, newsletters etc. With the pending arrival of 8 new super-post-Panamax cranes from Shanghai, China, however, we wanted to try something different to inform and engage the community. The GIS Department partnered with the Communications Department to include GIS as part of the community engagement strategy to inform the public about the cranes’ arrival to the Port of Tacoma last February and again in March of this year.

When the first 4 cranes arrived in February 2018, we created a crowdsourcing map that allowed both internal staff and the community to track the cranes’ current location in near-real time as it traveled through the Puget Sound and add photos captured as the cranes passed their neighborhood.

For the last 4 cranes arrival, we created a similar crowdsourcing map but added the ability for the viewer to see the route the vessel traveled from Shanghai, China and view both the current and previous vessel’s position (in near-real time). We also created a dashboard with drone video footage of the cranes leaving China, information on the vessel’s position, number of days at sea, estimated distance traveled and the estimated time of arrival at the Port of Tacoma. Both applications were displayed on big screens in the Port of Tacoma’s Administration Building and shared through social media. These simple GIS solutions provided a unique and fun way for the community to participate in the event.

Speakers
avatar for Tonya Kauhi

Tonya Kauhi

GIS Programs Manager, Port of Tacoma
Tonya has more than 18 years’ experience focusing on GIS, databases and applications. She is currently the GIS Programs Manager for the Port of Tacoma. She plans, coordinates, oversees and participates in the development, implementation, integration, operation, and maintenance of... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 8:30am - 8:45am
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

8:30am

How I have built a successful career in GIS
I attend many conferences and workshops every year and get asked by those just getting started how did I build my career. What did I do to be successful, learn, get jobs and projects and more. In this presentation, I will discuss the ins and outs of my career path and its many twists and turns. I will try to provide some guidance and advice on things I have learned along the way, often the hard way. Hopefully this will help those relatively new to the field avoid some of the pot holes I have encountered over my 25 plus years.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
GTCC RM 317 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

8:30am

Insights for ArcGIS
Insights for ArcGIS is available as part of ArcGIS Enterprise and Online and provides a new user experience for analysis that focuses on simpler ways to work with your data in order to answer questions and share results—including visualization, drag and drop analytics, and on-the-fly filtering and aggregations. Insights for ArcGIS is designed to make interactive and exploratory analysis fast and intuitive so that you can gain understanding from your data in a spatial context. You will learn how to get started with Insights for ArcGIS, including adding data from numerous sources, exploring some of the available analyses, and seeing how to share results and models, as we work through some analysis examples.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:15am
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

8:30am

Improved 911 Indoor Location Accuracy For Mobile Devices
Today more and more people rely on mobile phones as their primary phone service and are disconnecting wireline service altogether. As a result, more 9-1-1 calls are being placed from mobile phones than ever before, including inside buildings where traditional 9-1-1 mobile phone location technology does not work well. New location technology solutions are emerging that make calculation of indoor positions for mobile phones during a 9-1-1 call possible, and include major technology announcements from both Apple and Google in 2018 in this area. The ability to track mobile phones indoors during 9-1-1 calls will create new demands for 2D and 3D indoor GIS maps for 9-1-1 call takers, dispatchers, and emergency responders. This session will explore these new innovations in the 9-1-1 world, and discuss their impacts to GIS


Thursday May 23, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

8:45am

Stakeholder Engagement for Planning with ESRI Story Mapping
Using ESRI Story Maps for stakeholder outreach and engagement is an emerging use for story mapping and one that offers flexibility and beautiful design. The ability to smoothly integrate spatial and non-spatial data, along with web content and embedded survey questions allows easy stakeholder education and feedback all in one platform. The possibilities with story maps are limited only by your imagination…and how far you want to push the ESRI template.

For this lightning talk, I will go through the process I used to build an Online Open House for King County’s Shoreline Master Plan update. The map acts as one tool, yet it’s actually five different story maps and one web app all combined to function as one. I will share some insights on combining and ‘stacking’ different story map formats and share both the successes and challenges with using story mapping as a platform from which to engage stakeholders.

The templates built into the ESRI platform have great, targeted uses, and combining the different templates really allows story mapping to shine, and I hope to share that with you through this talk.

Speakers
BS

Ben Silver

I am a GIS Analyst, and have a background in cartography, environmental planning, and sustainability management. I enjoy using mapping and geospatial analysis to help empower communities, and to lend understanding to complex data and systems that would otherwise be inaccessible to... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 8:45am - 9:00am
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

9:00am

Cannabis Identification and Prioritization System (CIPS) - Using GIS To Identify Cannabis Grows And Prioritize Water Quality Concerns In Northern California
Over the last several years, the trend in California has been for marijuana growers to move their operations from the High Sierra forests to lower elevation foothill and valley locations to take advantage of better climatic, soil, and overall growing conditions. This has resulted in significant, additional environmental and water resource related concerns over Northern California watersheds, due to potentially increased pollution in the local, regional, and state water supplies through increased soil erosion, and nutrient and pesticide laden runoff.
Given the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) jurisdiction over waste discharges, the development of efficient tools that accurately and efficiently identify and characterize grow sites was desired. This resulted in the development of the Cannabis Identification and Prioritization System (CIPS). CIPS enables SWRCB and other stakeholders to identify priority water quality concerns by ranking those watersheds where marijuana grows pose the highest threats to water quality.
The goals for the CIPS solution include - a) Accurately identify marijuana grow locations and characteristics, b) Utilize the Water Boards’ ArcGIS platform, c) Develop user interfaces that enable the Water Boards and other agency end-users to access CIPS, assess conditions, and establish priorities for mitigation, and d) Scalable, both in terms of the geographic extent, and number of end-users accessing the system.

Speakers
SP

Solomon Pulapkura

Business Development Manager, VESTRA Resources, Inc
Business Development Manager


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

9:00am

An Overview of Spokane Tribe GIS (2019)
At the 2015 ESRI UC in San Diego, we first presented “An Overview of Spokane Tribe GIS”, at the 2018 National Tribal GIS Conference in Albuquerque an update. This is an update for 2019…

In 2010, Spokane Tribe GIS started on a new path beginning with the formation of the Spokane Tribe GIS Planning and Executive Committees. A draft strategic plan began in 2010 with comprehensive updates in 2013 and 2017. The program has evolved from 1000's of shapefiles to a centrally managed database with over 100 vector and raster layers. Since 2015, we experienced reservation area wildfires in 2015 and 2016; GIS supported federal BAER teams (satellite imagery and GIS data). Recent highlights have included the acquisition and processing of LiDAR and high-resolution imagery. Past projects have included efforts with GIS programs at the University of Washington and the CS program at Eastern Washington University. Tips, tricks, and lessons learned will be shared.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am
GTCC RM 317 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

9:15am

Technologies for Local Govt Crisis Management
The market is becoming overly complex with technology options and IT jargons. Organizations face continuous challenges to accomplish more with less to address emergencies, compliance, legal and regulatory requirements, IT and GIS strategies, and resiliency. Optimal systems and processes are needed to address these moving gears, and improve business performance, plan for resiliency and business continuity, and operations efficiency. Understanding, planning, and implementing right technologies in the correct way at the right time is key to successfully deliver citizen services. Technologies like drones, virtual and augmented reality, cloud services, mobile apps, scenario and time series analysis etc. are becoming commonplace to enable local govt. achieve their resiliency goals and serve citizens better. We will also discuss how some organizations are already using these technologies to be responsive and getting more done with less resources.

Speakers
avatar for Arnab Bhowmick

Arnab Bhowmick

Founder & CEO, Aakavs Aktivov Asset Management
Mr. Arnab Bhowmick is the Founder and CEO of Aakavs Aktivov Asset Management, which has been recognized as an Emerging Leader by US SBA in 2017. He and his team have implemented several technology including GIS, Asset Management, Cloud, Resilient systems over last couple decades... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:15am - 10:00am
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

9:30am

The USGS NHDPlus High Resolution Dataset and its Value-Added Attributes
The United States Geological Survey (USGS) maintains hydrography datasets for the Nation. The National Hydrography Dataset Plus High Resolution (NHDPlus HR) dataset integrates the High Resolution National Hydrography Dataset, Watershed Boundary Dataset , and 3D Elevation Program digital elevation models. Value-added attributes (VAAs) within the NHDPlus HR dataset provide pre-calculated network characteristics. NHDPlus HR VAA’s provide users with a rich source of data for hydrologic analysis and modeling to help our understanding of how water flows through the network and aid in predicting impacts of events such as flooding and contamination anywhere along the network. VAAs usefulness in the analysis and visualization of network characteristics will be highlighted and demonstrated in this lightning talk.

Speakers
KM

Kevin McNinch

Kevin McNinch is a cartographer and spatial data architect with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) working on hydrography data for the National Hydrography Dataset. Kevin works in an applied research role helping to solve problems and integrate new technologies.


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:30am - 9:45am
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

9:45am

Resilience of seagrasses communities exposed to pulsed freshwater discharges: A seascape approach
Seagrass communities display complex population patch dynamics at seascape scale that are presently poorly understood as most studies of disturbance on seagrass habitats have focused on changes in biomass at small, quadrat-level scales. In this study, analyses of remote sensing imagery and population modelling were applied to understand seagrass patch dynamics and forecast the fate of these important communities in Biscayne Bay, Miami, Florida, US. We evaluated the historical influence of freshwater deliveries from the Florida Everglades on seagrass communities and documented how changes in salinity can cause seascape fragmentation. Seagrass fragmentation rates were higher in sites adjacent to freshwater canals compared to sites spatially removed from these influences. Furthermore, we documented a clear trend in patch mortality rates with respect to patch size, with the smallest patches undergoing 57% annual mortality on average. The combination of higher fragmentation rates and the higher mortality of smaller seagrass patches in habitats exposed to pulses of low salinity raises concern for the long-term persistence of seagrass meadows in nearshore urban habitats of Biscayne Bay that are presently targets of Everglades restoration. The combined remote sensing and population modelling approach used here provides evaluation and predictive tools that can be used by managers to track seagrass status and stress-response at seascape levels not available previously for the seagrasses of South Florida.

Speakers
CS

Clinton Stipek

Clinton Stipek is a Spatial Analysis Assistant at the University of Miami studying population dynamics of seagrass populations within Biscayne Bay in Florida.


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:00am
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

10:15am

Thursday Morning Break
Take a break, stretch, hydrate, ect…

Thursday May 23, 2019 10:15am - 10:30am
GTCC Foyer Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

10:30am

DTA Presentation - Creative Economy in Seattle through a Racial Equity Lens
There has been a groundswell of interest and demand for data that speaks to the creative economy workforce of the city of Seattle from diverse public agencies such as the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture (ARTS), Office of Economic Development (OED), Washington Filmworks, and the City of Bellevue, ArtsFund, and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). There is a window of opportunity not only to understand and assess the creative economy but to use it as a driver of the economy to promote social inclusion, equity, diversity, and development. In the last 20 years, the city of Seattle has undergone a profound transformation that has resulted in a number of opportunities and challenges as a magnet for talent in the areas of technology, innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Under such circumstances, Seattle can become a leader in the development of the creative economy agenda. The Seattle MSA area had an estimated 131,163 creative jobs and over $23 billion earned in the region, gaining 12% since 2016 (Creative Vitality Suite, 2019). However, we don’t know who are the most marginalized communities of artists and art organizations by the rising economic inequality, gentrification and displacement in Seattle? As well as how are they geographically distributed throughout King County? By mapping where these creative occupations and industries are can set a direction for stakeholders intervention and policies that maintain a vibrant city and especially one that is equitable for all communities in Seattle. Through the use of GIS, the goal will be to determine if location is one of the factors for the failure of representation in the creative economy and make appropriate recommendations to address the issues. 

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 10:30am - 10:45am
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

10:30am

Examining the Effects of Physical Barriers on Healthcare Accessibility in the West Bank
Travel restrictions imposed by the Israeli government in and around the West Bank presents myriad access issues for residents of the West Bank, including access to critical healthcare. The political situation renders standard methods of measuring healthcare access ineffective; this project seeks to mitigate that by using a different methodology to get a more realistic representation of primary healthcare access levels for West Bank residents. The short supply of specialty healthcare services throughout much of the West Bank forces Palestinians to travel through Israeli-administered areas - where they are subjected to various impediments including checkpoints and road closures - to receive medical care. Thus, using simple proximity to the nearest hospital to measure healthcare access, a typical method of measurement, is inadequate for much of the West Bank. This research project uses the floating catchment areas (FCA) methodology to address travel time - making it possible to measure the impact of the checkpoints and road closures - and availability of resources to determine a more realistic measure of healthcare access for the population. This presentation will illustrate which population centers have the lowest access and are therefore most at-risk, and will show how this method can be used to identify locations for future facilities with high potential to alleviate current shortfalls.

Speakers
JS

James Skoryanc

Geospatial Analyst, United States Air Force. Penn State University Masters of GIS, student


Thursday May 23, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

10:30am

Free open source software for GIS (FOSS4G): what is it?
This talk will introduce attendees to Free Open Source GIS. There are many tools available to GIS professionals, but where to begin? This talk will show you where to start. An explanation of Free and Open Source Software will be followed by a discussion of the best open source GIS tools for desktop, web mapping and database that are comparable to Esri’s ArcGIS, ArcGIS Online and Geodatabase (SDE).

Speakers
avatar for Peter Keum

Peter Keum

GIS Specialist- Senior, King County Wastewater Treatment Division
Peter Keum has worked for King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) GIS for over 20 years and has been an Esri user for all those years. He has been a huge open source GIS enthusiast who lives in Seattle, WA. He is a member of CUGSO (Cascadia Users of Geospatial Open Source... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

10:30am

Women in GIS
The number of women working in GIS careers has grown over the past several years.  This panel discussion will feature professional GIS women in different stages of their career; from those just starting, those at the mid-level, and those who’ve been in it for the long-haul.  Learn about each person’s unique experiences that have guided them to where they are today and ask the panel questions that may help you on your path.  Discussion topics will include navigating geospatial careers as women, mentorship (both received and given), and much more.

Thursday May 23, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
GTCC RM 317 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

10:45am

DTA Presentation - Applying GIS to support salmonid conservation efforts in the Lower Nehalem Watershed, OR
Despite coho salmon acting as a key economic, ecological, and cultural staple throughout the Pacific Northwest, populations have significantly declined over the past several decades due to fishing pressure and habitat loss through commercial timber harvest. As a result, considerable effort has been taken to establish regulatory policies and remediation practices to restore populations of spawning adults. The Lower Nehalem Watershed Council (LNWC) cooperates with local, state, and federal agencies to preserve and protect 310 square miles of the lower reaches of the Nehalem River on the coast of northern Oregon. Currently, however, the LNWC lacks a unified database of habitat and species information. To aid in identifying existing data gaps, the LNWC and contributing partners have developed the Nehalem Strategic Action Plan for coho salmon, which relies on a rapid bio-assessment strategy to identify key factors limiting salmonid distribution and reproduction. We have collaborated with the LNWC to generate spatial information related to habitat characterization and species distributions using geoprocessing tool packages in ArcMap, such as network analyst and spatial analyst. Our analyses has aided in the identification of key anchor habitats that consist of large fish abundances and high numbers of spawning individuals, in addition to those areas with high numbers of fish but low seeding rates, to help the LNWC prioritize candidate areas on which to focus restoration efforts. Our work has also resulted in an online open-source tool and generation of several maps that provide a visual representation of the current status of salmonids and other fish or mammalian species of interest throughout the watershed. The strategies employed here will help to establish base-line metrics that can be used to evaluate the efficiency of conservation efforts, and that can identify long-term trends relevant to the management of coho salmon and other species of interest.


Thursday May 23, 2019 10:45am - 11:05am
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

11:00am

Python Tooling and Debugging in ArcMap
Do you want to build Python scripts and tools for the Esri environment, but aren't sure what tooling will be useful? Need to debug your code from ArcMap or Pro but aren’t sure how best to go about it? What happens when you upgrade something? This session is designed to introduce the benefits of using an Integrated Development Environment for Python, how to connect an IDE to ArcMap and ArcGIS Pro, and how this can help your debugging experience. This presentation will also introduce how to incorporate git version control and understand when you might benefit from it.

Speakers
avatar for Grant Herbert

Grant Herbert

Senior GIS Analyst/Developer, FLO Analytics
Grant Herbert has 14 years of experience in the geospatial industry. His expertise includes GIS data management, asset management, spatial database and server technologies, creating automated tools, and building Web-based data visualizations. As the lead for many GIS Consortium member... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

11:00am

Urban to Wild: Connecting People to Parks in King County
Natural beauty and outdoor opportunities are two of the defining characteristics of the Puget Sound region. From hundreds of miles of trails to scenic park land to play areas in neighborhood parks, there are opportunities to match a wide variety of outdoor recreational desires. Access to nearby nature should be available across the region, yet almost 25% of King County residents are unable to enjoy the numerous benefits associated with easy access to parks and open space. As the region’s population grows by 50 people per day, public land becomes increasingly scarce, which restricts access to those with money and resources to get there. Our talk will explain how we worked with The Wilderness Society’s Urban to Wild program to combine data from the US Census, King County, PSRC, and other sources to measure walking access to parks, transit access to parks, park pressure, and a number of other factors across a variety of sociodemographic characteristics. We will explain how to use the GTFS and Better Bus Buffers analysis tools in ArcMap, how to extract relevant data from the American Communities Survey, and explain how our findings can help policy makers increase accessibility to outdoor recreation opportunities throughout the County.

Speakers
EA

Elena Arakaki

Urban to Wild Coordinator, The Wilderness Society
Elena Arakaki is the Urban to Wild Coordinator at TWSIn her role as the Urban to Wild Coordinator, Elena Arakaki merges her commitments to social equity, environmental sustainability, and urban livability. Before becoming Coordinator, Elena worked as the Urban to Wild Intern for eight... Read More →
avatar for Matt Stevenson

Matt Stevenson

Principal, CORE GIS
Matt Stevenson is Principal at CORE GIS where he specializes in cartography, spatial analysis, web mapping, and GIS project management. He works primarily with government agencies and non-profits focused on public policy, natural resources, and conservation.


Thursday May 23, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

11:05am

DTA Presentation - Sound Transit's Interactive Noise Map Application (INMA)
Sound Transit requested an Interactive Noise Map Application (INMA) to display noise information pertaining to the Link Light Rail and its expansion projects. The project consisted of creating a noise map on ArcGIS Desktop and publishing the feature layers to a server, which then conveys the noise data to a community-based website. The map used open-source parcel information from King, Snohomish, and Pierce Counties, and noise data from the 90% Final Design Documents of the Lynnwood Link Extension project. INMA currently focuses on the North Link Light Rail expansion from Northgate Mall to Lynnwood, Washington. However, INMA has the potential to accommodate all of the Sound Transit projects. The website is designed so that users can search by address or parcel ID, scroll through the map, and retrieve specific noise information by selecting a parcel. The website is accessible on all devices and autofits to the device. The goal of INMA is to create a website that effectively displays noise information for the community. The map uses three core layers: Link Light Rail Track, Link Light Rail Station, and Parcel Noise Data. The Parcel Noise Data shows existing noise levels in the area, both before and after mitigation. The user can choose which type of noise map is displayed. The map’s symbology classifies noise into five different groups: 0-56 dBA, 57-59 dBA, 60-65 dBA, 66-70 dBA, and 71-80 dBA. These groups were specified by Sound Transit, as any level under 60 decibels (dBA) is not a concern. Levels between 60 and 65 dBA could approach the maximum allowable noise level. Parcels above 65 dBA are at risk of exceeding the allowable noise levels specified by the Federal Transit Administration. Details of INMA’s creation and design can be found in the Technical Report submitted to Sound Transit.


Thursday May 23, 2019 11:05am - 11:25am
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

11:25am

DTA Presentation - Beaver Relocation in Upper Columbia River Basin
Beavers (Castor canadensis) are foundation species that have many positive impacts on the hydrology and ecology of temperate watersheds through their modifications of small, low-gradient streams, but can be considered a nuisance when their activities are in conflict with human land use. Beaver populations in North America were greatly reduced due to the high demand for beaver pelts and because of human competition for  productive valleys, but have increased over the last century, although often in human-conflict areas. Many land managers now recognize the benefits of relocating nuisance beavers to suitable locations in remote areas to provide maintenance and restoration of stream and riparian ecosystems. Trout Unlimited (TU), a non-profit organization with the mission to conserve, protect and restore cold water fisheries, watersheds, and ecosystems,  is implementing a multi-year project to relocate nuisance beavers to suitable locations in upper Columbia River watersheds. Under their sponsorship, we are implementing a GIS-based model to determine stream reaches within the Entiat, Okanogan and Methow Basins that are (1) suitable for beaver relocation and that have been (2) identified as critical areas for fish recovery efforts. The spatial criteria we are using to predict high beaver potential include stream gradient, streamflow, basin width, vegetation type, land use and fish restoration priority ranking. Since the presence of beaver dams in Upper Columbia basins is difficult to detect with remote sensing, we will also develop an Esri Collector mobile application to support field observations for restoration projects. Our model will benefit current conservation efforts by Trout Unlimited and collaborating organizations, and will be designed and documented so that it can be modified for field data collection and site selection for other watersheds.


Thursday May 23, 2019 11:25am - 11:45am
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

11:30am

Creating an Accessible Resource Guide for Pierce County using Operations Dashboards
At Comprehensive Life Resources, we have been providing behavioral health services to the Tacoma and Pierce County community for over 50 years, and homeless outreach services for over 20 years. In the last two years, there has been a need for an easily accessible, easy-to-use, electronic resource guide for those experiencing homelessness and poverty. This project, Pierce County Resources at www.piercecountyresources.com, was the culmination of many hours of research and coding and data management and is still a work in progress. Using Operations Dashboard and Survey123, as well as Squarespace for website management, an interactive tool was created to allow for users to conduct their own research for resources in their area. Categories include: Clothing, Food, Shelter, Substance Use Treatment, Employment Services, Domestic Violence or Sexual Assault Services, and many more. Since many services are gender-specific, there is an easy to follow pictogram guide to filter services to men, women, families, veterans, or members of the LGBTQ community. The response to the launch of this website in December 2018 has been overwhelmingly positive, despite the site needing more resources.

Speakers
RC

Rainey Carlin

Rainey Carlin is a recent graduate of the GIS Certificate program at University of Washington in Tacoma and the Data & Solutions Analyst for the Homeless Outreach team and the Tacoma Gang Prevention Initiative team, Rising Above the Influence (R.A.I.N), at Comprehensive Life Resources... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

11:30am

Why a Jupyter Notebook Makes a Fabulous Open-source Mapping Application
A Jupyter notebook is an open-source web application that allows you to create documents that contain live code, charts, and yes, maps! When combined with open-source Python libraries like geopandas, matplotlib, shapely, and others, we have everything we need to create and share a robust, attractive, and reproducible GIS workflow. In this talk, we’ll go over the ins and outs of the Jupyter Notebook and give several demonstrations of the unique qualities they bring to spatial analysis.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

12:00pm

Lunch
Food

Thursday May 23, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
GTCC Ballroom Foyer Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

12:00pm

WAURISA Member Meeting
Meeting with your fellow WAURISA Members. Make new friends but keep the old. One is silver and the other gold.

Thursday May 23, 2019 12:00pm - 1:15pm
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

1:30pm

DTA Presentation - Historic Preservation Downtown Kent Core Walking Tour
The project focuses on the Historical Preservation of historic buildings and landmarks in Kent, Washington and public art – the dragonflies. The purpose of the project is to identify historical building and landmark, identify its integrity, community engagement and ultimately recognize these building and landmarks as the city’s assets. Furthermore, I am interested in the sustainability of the Historic Building and Landmarks preservation, therefore, identifying economic opportunities for local business. I am conducting this research project to find out all the historic buildings and landmarks in the target area and do a walking tour to visit the historic buildings and landmarks and the public art - dragonflies.     The project has three research questions; 1) Where are the historic building and landmarks in Kent and its historical significance? Answering this question will give me the extent and location of the historical building and landmarks. The Greater Kent Historical Society and Museum is a volunteer-run non-profit organization that works closely with the community and the City of Kent in preserving Kent’s history has two lists that will be my start point for the research. Second, what is the infrastructure available for vehicles and pedestrians if any to access all the historic building and landmarks in Kent? I am interested in finding out if a vehicle is needed to access the historic building and landmarks or if a resident can walk to access it. The walkability is a major part of the analysis and scope of the capstone. Third, how can the City of Kent leverage the historical building and landmarks as assets by economic development, community engagement, actively promote and preserve the sites? Sustainability of Historic Preservation is vital for the long-term. By answering the third question, I can identify community assets, stakeholders, and add value to the historical building and landmarks.   The intended audience of the Historic Preservation GIS Capstone are, the City of Kent, Mayor’s Office, the Landmarks Commissioner, the community of Kent, local schools, children and tourists. The City of Kent has a rich history that most of us are unaware of. As population increases, more than ever, pressures are placed on limited resources for rapid economic development and regeneration projects to fulfill the growing demands of urbanization. Thus, historical building and landmarks are at risk of being lost or redeveloped and by identifying and recognizing as assets will become a placemaking tool for the city and community. The project is relevant because it connects residents to the history of the city, created significance to the place and creates a private and public moment as visitors experience the space with community and love one. The sense of place and belonging is created with shared experiences.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 1:45pm
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

1:30pm

Use of LIDAR data to help with mapping wetland boundaries
The Planning Division in Pierce County maintains a wetland layer for unincorporated Pierce County known as the County Wetland Inventory that is edited based on field visits related to land development. This method ensures that a wetland boundary is verified and accurately mapped within the property being reviewed. The problem with this method is that there is no mapping of the wetland boundary outside of the property being reviewed. This is where the use of LIDAR data to visualize the ground elevations has been beneficial for many instances.

LIDAR and derived products viewed through LP360, as an ESRI ArcMap extension, has been used to expand the capabilities of wetland mapping for the past two years. It has been used to refine previously mapped wetlands as well as expand the boundaries of wetlands verified and delineated during field visits. LIDAR has not been the answer in all cases but has been very helpful. Until a time when all wetlands have been mapped in the field (not likely) a tool such as LIDAR will continue to play an integral role.

Speakers
AP

Aaron Petersen

Mr. Aaron Petersen is a GIS Specialist with the Pierce County department of Planning and Public Works. He has worked as a GIS professional for over ten years, with experience working with both local governments and federal natural resource agencies. He holds a M.A. in Geography from... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

1:30pm

Developing recreation data so you can tell custom stories
Washington Hometown has developed a statewide data set of recreation and culture with information (attribute and geometry) on over 16,000 recreation resources from national parks to pocket parks, trails, museums, boat launches and more. As we add more information and use the data for maps, apps and analysis, we are constantly faced with the challenge of making sure we are collecting the right information about each place to be able to meet diverse needs. Snowmobilers, hikers, campers, and wine-tourists are looking for different information and yet many places are relevant to more than one use. When we developed our classification scheme and decided what information to collect about each place, we modeled it on existing systems. But as we have acquired data from over 150 sources and used it to create numerous maps and apps tailored to different users, we have been forced to adjust what we collect about each place. We have had to consider our classification schemes: is a pocket park the same as a plaza? We have had to reconsider what information we collect: does road biking and mountain biking capture the full bike experience or do we need to include e-bikes, embikes and fat tire bikes. And we are constantly adjusting the information we deliver to give each user group what they need without overwhelming them. In this talk we will look at some of the challenges that we have faced in figuring out how to classify places, deciding what information to collect, and determining what information to use on each tailored map or app.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Hackett

Jennifer Hackett

Owner, Washington Hometown
Jennifer Hackett started her GIS consulting business, Manastash Mapping, in 2009 with the goal of helping people share information about their communities. She has an MS in Resource Management from Central Washington University where she has taught GIS. In her previous life, she spent... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
GTCC RM 317 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

1:30pm

The Tacoma Equity Index: Advancing Opportunity Mapping to Inform Local Policy
In the decade since Opportunity Mapping has come onto the scene, The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity has employed the methodology in partnership with cities across the country to better understand equity and opportunity. This work has led to policy changes that have made cities and regions more equitable. This presentation will explore the Tacoma Equity Index, an index designed in partnership with the City of Tacoma Office of Equity and Human Rights to inform the creation of policies to create a more just and equitable Tacoma where all people have the opportunity to succeed. This presentation will walk participants through the equity index process, which employs a participatory design approach and focus on how local data can be incorporated into these indexes to achieve a more nuanced understanding of local equity and opportunity priorities. Next, participants will explore the tool and learn firsthand how such a tool can be used to craft equitable policy at the city and neighborhood scale. Presenters will then answer questions from the audience.


Thursday May 23, 2019 1:30pm - 2:30pm
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

1:45pm

DTA Presentation - Proposed Remediation Sites Due to Arsenic and Lead Contamination: Protecting Vulnerable Populations
In 1993, a nearly 100-year-old remnant of the Asarco copper smelter was demolished along the Ruston and Tacoma, Washington waterfront. Though the smelter was shut down in 1985, the effects are still seen throughout the South Sound region. An estimated 1,000 square miles, known as the Tacoma Smelter Plume, has been affected by the decades the air emissions, mostly arsenic and lead, from the plant. However, despite the smelter having been demolished in the 1990s, Asarco and Washington State did not reach a settlement until 2009, allowing for a more comprehensive Soil Safety Program. With a new influx of funding, the previous years of soil samples could be assessed to determine which sites require remediation. In this project, the city of Tacoma will be analyzed to determine the high-risk areas for arsenic and lead exposure for high-risk populations. The result will be specific parcels in Tacoma where the anticipated levels of arsenic and/or lead will be higher that the acceptable levels for Washington state, as well as have high density of children under 10 and high likelihood of homeless populations.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 1:45pm - 2:05pm
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:00pm

Using Google Earth Engine to Map Riparian Vegetation Change in Chelan County
How do you measure riparian vegetation change over time? There are many possible solutions, ranging from visual inspection of air photos to object oriented classification of satellite imagery. When we were asked by Chelan County to map riparian vegetation change between 2011-2017 to help them with their Voluntary Stewardship Program monitoring report, we chose to use Google Earth Engine because of its speed, flexibility, and replicability. Our talk will cover three main topics: 1) How we determined the extent of riparian vegetation in Chelan County; 2) How we classified vegetation and analyzed change between the two time periods; 3) How we used a digital surface model to measure vegetation height and increase the accuracy of the change detection by reducing the number of false positives and false negatives. We will look at a few lines of Javascript, but primarily will focus on the overall process--how we did it, what worked well, what was challenging, and what we might do differently on subsequent analyses.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Stevenson

Matt Stevenson

Principal, CORE GIS
Matt Stevenson is Principal at CORE GIS where he specializes in cartography, spatial analysis, web mapping, and GIS project management. He works primarily with government agencies and non-profits focused on public policy, natural resources, and conservation.


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:05pm

DTA Presentation - Time-Space Mapping in Congressional Districts—Using Distance Cartograms to Explore Gerrymandering
Gerrymandering, a process of spatial exclusion and marginalization, has a long and sordid history in the United States. The upcoming 2020 US Census and subsequent need for alterations to political districts are again bringing this topic into focus. GIS has been identified among the best tools for identifying and preventing this practice. However, most GIS analysis of gerrymandering (or, indeed any spatial phenomena) to date has relied almost exclusively on approaches that use absolute representations of space (O’Sullivan et al. 2018). Yet these strictly Euclidean perspectives may fail to account for inequalities that continue to exist in alternate—but very real—relational and experienced spaces. To this end, we revisit the quantitative revolution in geography, a period during the 1960’s and 70’s when researchers (Tobler, Harvey, Bunge, Forer and others) were exploring new ways of representing space. While these perspectives offered exciting new insight, these types of transformations required complex mathematical computation and methods that were not yet well-developed. These technical challenges were among the many reasons that the pursuit of these types of visualizations were largely abandoned. Using new and improved computational tools, we hope to improve upon these efforts, providing a process for generating new visualizations that explore these relational spaces within congressional districts. Specifically, we look at representations of space as travel time, not distance We also discuss the challenges, successes, and future applications of this tool for providing new representations of the complex and dynamic relational spaces that exist all around us. [O'Sullivan D, Bergmann L, and Thatcher JE, 2018, Spatiality, maps, and mathematics in critical human geography: Toward a repetition with difference. The Professional Geographer, 70(1): 129-139. doi:10.1080/00330124.2017.1326081]

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 2:05pm - 2:25pm
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:15pm

Public Agency Collaboration through Community Asset Mapping
Public Agency Collaboration through Community Asset Mapping
Public agencies across the Puget Sound region are examining how they can work together and use their existing resources to equitably and holistically meet the needs of a rapidly changing region. Public entities and tribes in the Tacoma area have long worked together through the Joint Municipal Action Committee (JMAC), which brings representatives from these entities together to discuss common interests.

Forterra, City of Tacoma Information Technology, and Metro Parks Tacoma Information Services were tasked by JMAC with developing a community asset map and recommendations that improve coordination and cooperation across the public sector in deploying and activating their real estate assets for community, economic, affordable housing, recreation, and environmental benefits.

The GIS model started with the identification of redevelopable publicly owned land followed by gap analysis designating serviced and not serviced areas by agency.

Public agency staff was surveyed and asked to rank the criteria most important to them when evaluating land to meet their strategic priorities to serve the public. High priorities shared across each agency included displacement risk, planned growth, access to transit, proximity to parks, and neighborhood amenities.

Agencies also had individual priorities that were specific to their strategic plans and projects. These criteria were then turned into indicators that eventually became a composite index that meet the highest-ranked criteria shared by all agencies, and individual indices that meet the highest-ranked criteria specific to each agency.

These were then visualized through a story map in ESRI ArcGIS Online that showed geospatial data and recommendations for collaborating and coordinating real estate asset needs. This story map and recommendations will provide a data-driven understanding of how publicly-owned parcels can be deployed to serve agency-specific strategic needs, as well as how these agencies could collaborate to achieve multiple benefits.

Speakers
avatar for ADRIANA ABRAMOVICH

ADRIANA ABRAMOVICH

Senior, IT Analyst (GIS), City of Tacoma
Adriana Abramovich, Senior GIS Analyst, City of Tacoma IT-GIS | Adriana has 15 years of experience supporting Municipal Governments currently working as Senior GIS Analyst for the City of Tacoma. She provides technical support in projects throughout the organization, contributes... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:15pm - 3:00pm
GTCC RM 317 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:25pm

DTA Presentation - Washington State Rooftop and Community Solar Installations: A Spatiotemporal Analysis
The cost of rooftop and community solar applications has been falling, becoming more cost competitive with traditional sources of electricity. Consumers have recognized this cost saving opportunity and taken advantage of incentive policies, such as the Washington State Renewable Energy System Incentive Program (RESIP); however, there has been limited research to understand how these incentive programs have performed, or where residents have applied for them. This project’s goal is to study the spatiotemporal patterns of rooftop and community solar installations registered under RESIP during a 20-month period over the years 2017 and 2018. The data was obtained from the Washington State University Energy Program. A time series analysis using small multiple maps provides enhanced detail about how the geographies of solar installations changed on a monthly and seasonal basis. This analysis examines the raw number of installations, as well as the total electrical capacity of the installed systems. These variables are shown using choropleth maps, as well as hot spot maps derived using Getis and Ord’s Gi* statistic. The maps show consistently high uptake clusters in Northwestern Washington, with seasonal summertime trends in South Central Washington. Installations and capacity in South Central Washington saw significant expansion during the summer months of 2018. Learning how solar uptake has spread across the state can assist policy makers to identify why solar is installed in certain areas, help enhance advertising by focusing on low uptake areas, and improve future incentive policies offered by both local and state governments.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 2:25pm - 2:45pm
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:30pm

The Land Use Mapping Tool: The Arcpy Mapping Module in a Land Use Planning Context
Land use planners are also cartographers, mapping projects in relation to regulated areas such as streams, wetlands, shoreline buffers, and geologic hazards. Planners also serve as liaisons between project proponents, other agencies with jurisdiction, and the public. Information concerning location, physiographic setting, and relevant jurisdictional boundaries is disseminated to these stakeholders electronically, often with GIS generated maps. However, many planners are cartographers by circumstance rather than by training. Map generation by less experienced GIS users can be time consuming and error prone, while producing visually unpleasant maps. The arcpy mapping module provides a possible solution to these issues, providing quickly generated, accurate, and visually pleasing maps for dissemination during project review. In the Kittitas County jurisdiction of Washington, the Land Use Mapping Tool has been developed, allowing fast, efficient generation of project maps. The process uses a layerfile and server location as inputs and applies a python function to test whether project boundaries intersect regulated areas. Areas intersecting project areas are mapped, while certain areas maps are exported regardless of intersection to provide necessary information to project reviewers and the public. Tools such as the Land Use Mapping Tool demonstrate the power and versatility of automated cartography in land use planning contexts.

Speakers
DP

Dusty Pilkington

I recently completed a Master of Science degree in Cultural and Environmental Resource Management at Central Washington University, titled "Two Post-Glacial Fire Records at the Wildland-Urban Interface, Eastern Cascades, Washington". The work involves using charred particle analysis... Read More →


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:30pm - 2:45pm
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:30pm

Using ESRI Tools to Update Tacoma Water Work Processes
Twice a year, the Tacoma Water Electrical team visits 400 Cathodic Protection Test Stations to take readings. These readings were done by hand in a notebook and then manually entered into an Access database back at the office. This data was then ported to Excel and visualized with an unwieldy table and graph. Using GIS, we revamped this process to allow workers to use Survey123 to enter readings directly into their phone or computer in the field. These readings are automatically sent to the server and processed daily using a Python script that updates a Geocortex Map and an ESRI Dashboard that the supervisor can easily analyze.

This presentation will dissect the journey to create and implement this new process and cover topics like:

Linking Survey123 to existing datasets
Visualizing season to season data along linear assets
Handling attachments created in Survey123
Programming with ArcGIS API for Python
Visually Stunning Charts using Plotly
Programmatically Entering Data into SAP Asset Management System

Speakers
avatar for Keith Burdette

Keith Burdette

IT Analyst, Tacoma Water
Computer Science Graduate with 3 Years of GIS Experience at Tacoma Water


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
GTCC RM 316 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:45pm

Where’s that Data
This talk will provide a case study of a problem one of our clients and embedded staff had that is likely a common problem across GIS shops, “Where’s that data??”.  GIS has been around long enough that GIS practitioners have a wide variety of places they have pigeon holed data over the years.  These places range from the local users hard drive, portal hard drives on a shelf, ArcGIS Online, SharePoint, Google Drive, Network Attached Storage (NAS) storage, and the organizations central data repository in a relational database.  In addition, most shops have a regular fire hose of new data coming in from a wide variety of sources, such as regional GIS clearing houses, contractors, and federal sources.  Lastly, people likely receive numerous emails, periodicals, and other notification of cool data sites that might “one day” be really handy.  In the talk we will show how our client and our embedded staff overcame the problem of sorting through all these potential data locations and came up with a way to figure out how to answer the question “Where’s that data??”


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:45pm - 3:00pm
GTCC RM 318 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

2:45pm

DTA Presentation - Characterizing the impact of the Kariba Dam on the geomorphology of the Zambezi River using a GIS based model
Dams cause significant geomorphological changes to river systems by attenuating floods and preventing the transport of sediment downstream. Satellite images from the European Space Agency were used to understand the effect of the Kariba dam on the sediment transport of one of the world’s largest rivers, the Zambezi river, by developing bathymetric maps of the river downstream from the Kariba Dam. A calibration curve was developed using depths recorded in the field using a sonar-based depth sounder. Translation of sand bars is apparent on the maps and allows us to estimate the rate at which sand is moving downstream. The volume and velocity of these moving sand bars was measured by developing a GIS based model characterizing the depth of the river. Using high resolution multispectral images captured from the Sentinel 2A satellite on July 19th and September 2nd, 2018, the images were converted into a raster layer of pixels whose values represented estimated depths of the river at any given location. Sand bars, visible from high resolution satellite images, are present in reaches downstream of the Kariba Dam and have appeared to be moving steadily over time. Sediment transport to this reach of the river is essentially cut off by the dam leaving the source of these sediments unknown. It is likely that the river bed elevation is dropping as the sand washes downstream and is not replaced. Sand bars located in a reach of the river where image resolution and quality was highest were manually digitized in GIS. The rate at which they move downstream was calculated by measuring the distance between the position of the sand bars over the two images taken 44 days apart.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 2:45pm - 3:00pm
GTCC RM 315 Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

3:00pm

Thursday Afternoon Break
Take a break, stretch, hydrate, ect…

Thursday May 23, 2019 3:00pm - 3:15pm
GTCC Foyer Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402

3:15pm

Closing Plenary
Goodbye

Thursday May 23, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm
GTCC Ballroom Greater Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St, Tacoma, WA 98402